Poetry Revolt- ELA AP9

Written by Sequoia Abbott-Saulteaux


Photo by Taylor Wright on Unsplash

This lesson plan was made in part by my amazing co-operating teacher during my pre-internship. I had the great opportunity of working with an ELA AP course during the same time that they were studying the 1917 Russian Revolution as an introduction to the book Animal Farm. While this lesson was made in tandem with another lesson involving a vocabulary bank, I still believe that with some effort, this lesson can be greatly beneficial for other subjects and topics. This activity is a great introduction into poetry, since it offers the student opportunity to try out new methods and forms. The added bonus of incorporating a vocabulary bank allows the student a chance to really comprehend the words by using them in poetry. Overall, I think this was a great lesson that offered student engagement and creativity when played the right way.

Lesson Planning Template

Curriculum: Saskatchewan ELA AP9      Module/Unit/Outcome: Surviving and Conquering (Semester Two)

Materials/Preparation Required:

Worksheets from previous lesson
Poetry Revolt Sheet
Access to internet (laptops)    
Prerequisite Learning Required:

Students must know what poetry is
The students must know the Russian Revolution Vocabulary Words
The students must know how the online portal system works  
Target for Professional Growth:

Classroom Management
I maintain strong eye contact with students when conversing.
I move towards disruptive students in the classroom
I attend towards the needs of multiple students.
I move around the room while students are working.
I acknowledge raised hands when they happen.
I am ready with materials and handouts before students arrive.    
Co-Management Preparation for this Lesson:

Outcome for this lesson Indicator(s)

    CC9.1a, CC9.1b, Create various visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore identity (e.g., The Search for Self), social responsibility (e.g., Our Shared Narratives), and efficacy (e.g., Doing the Right Thing).  


 CC9.9a and CC9.9b Experiment with a variety of text forms (e.g., debates, meetings, presentations to unfamiliar audiences, poetry, précis, short script, advice column, video documentary, comic strip) and techniques (e.g., tone, persona, point of view, imagery, dialogue, figurative language).

a. Create and deliver a variety of personal, literary, and informational communications, including poems, stories, personal essays, and oral, visual, written, and multimedia presentations (e.g., written explanations, summaries, arguments, letters, biographies) that address identity, social responsibility, and efficacy.           
g. Write response to texts to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of the significant ideas of literary texts and support important ideas and viewpoints through accurate and detailed references to the text, and demonstrate awareness of the author’s use of language.     

h. Apply knowledge and strategies for composing pieces in a variety of forms/genres (e.g., descriptive, narrative, expository, persuasive, poetic, script).    
   

Lesson Construction:

Activating and Engaging:              
What do I need to adapt here to help all students be successful?  

Group Discussion:  Share what you learnt about the Russian Revolution and research areas that you may dispute or that you misunderstood to create clarity.  Share facts or clarify definitions.  This will help you determine whether your research was on the right track or what more you could do next time.    

https://quizizz.com/admin/quiz/5dcf209bfe6e98001c8542d1/poetic-devices
Quizzes “Poetic Devices” to test the prior knowledge of what students know about poetry, and assess which students may need more help.
Exploring and discovering:           
Using words, themes, ideas or even phrases you read in your research create a short poem that grasps some of what you learnt while researching the Russian Revolution.  There is no form required to write this poem.

What are some potential forms or characteristics of poetry that I could use?

Rhyme: poetry can be experimental, or it can have structure
Shape: Ballads are poems and read like song lyrics
Use of figurative language (imagery): Poems can be Free Verse with no form
Rhythm or beats within the line: poems can be descriptive, persuasive, narrative etc.
Internal Rhyme: poems can be thematic, ie. A nature poem   *Google some poems and read some examples to inspire your form.  
Organizing and Integrating:          
Students will use the success criteria to complete the poetry project and turn in to the student portal.  

Success Criteria:
____ Creative Poem has a title
____ MLA formatted information is in the top left hand corner double spaced
____ form of poem is student choice (size, font, colour, images etc)
____ topic of poem is inspired by or related to ideas about The Russian Revolution
____  at least TWO words from our intro vocabulary are included in my poem
____  I have saved the document with a name (ie. Poetry Revolt by Mary)
____  I have TURNED IN and UPLOADED THE POEM TO MY BLOG        
Closing:
Students will be asked to complete a poetry prompt at their desk and hand it in at the end of the lesson.   .

Write a poem with at least 8 lines in which every line starts with the same three words: “You told me…” Notice how the repetition can create rhythm and reinforce meaning.  

3. The shortest “book” ever written is said to be a six-word sentence: “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” Write a six-word poem that carries the most meaning you can fit in it.

4.  Write an ode to an object you love. An ode is a poem that is typically short and lyrical. Your ode can be about something meaningful and symbolic, like a piece of jewelry or a book you cherish, or it can be about something less traditional like socks or French fries. (Check out Pablo Neruda’s work—he wrote odes to both!)  

5. Write an etheree poem. An etheree poem has 10 lines. The first has one syllable, the second has two, and so on, all the way up to ten.  

6. Finish the sentence, “At that moment, the whole world seemed to fit in a ___.” Finish the sentence, and use that sentence somewhere in a poem.  

7. Read e.e. cummings’ poem “l(a” or “a leaf falls on loneliness.” Write a similar poem in which you take a sentence or a phrase and make the visual elements of that poem (line spacing, capitalization, punctuation, etc.) complement or match the content of the poem itself. (These are called concrete poems, FYI.)  

8. Write a poem about a sound you grew up hearing. (ex: the whirr of a fishing reel, the snap of a newspaper opening, a cuckoo clock, etc.)  

9. Write a ballad about something that made you sad, either recently or as a child. (Typically ballads are narrative poems and have the rhyme scheme ABAB.)  

10. Write a poem that uses math to explain a feeling or emotion. Maybe it’s a love poem with a line like “2 – 1 = 0,” or maybe it’s a poem called “How to Find the Area of ___.” Could triangles be used to explain a feeling? What about slopes or square roots?  

11. Write a poem about something that is “broken” but not in the normal sense of the word.  Maybe it’s a dead moth you found on the ground, a bud that didn’t bloom like the rest of the flowers around it, a store in your neighborhood that closed down, or a person who is considered an outcast. Explore what makes this object broken and whether or not it is reparable.      

How have I planned for?

  • Meeting the needs of each learner by differentiating my instructional plans?
  • The literacy development of my students within this lesson?
  • Raising cultural awareness?

Poetry Revolt Activity

Outcomes: 

CC9.1a, CC9.1b, CC9.9a/b experiment with writing poetry, deliver a poem, create a poem that focuses (1.b) on main ideas and information

Using words, themes, ideas or even phrases you read in your research create a short poem that grasps some of what you learnt while researching the Russian Revolution. 
There is no form required to write this poem. 
What are some potential forms or characteristics of poetry that I could use?  

Rhyme                                                       – Poetry can be experimental, or it can have structure
-Shape                                                        – Ballads are poems and read like song lyrics
Use of Figurative Language (imagery)         – Poems can be Free Verse with no form
Rhythm or beats within The Line               – Poems can be descriptive, persuasive, narrative etc.Internal
Rhyme                                                      – Poems can be thematic, ie. A nature poem  

*Google some poems and read some examples to inspire your form.  
Length
Minimum of 20 words
Theme
Russian Revolution or any subtheme within
Language
Informal  *** You must incorporate at least TWO vocabulary words from Pre-Reading 1 exercise. 
Publish
Typed (you can choose the font, colour, size etc.) Feel free to add images to your poetry document *MLA formatted information in the top left hand corner

***Turn in your creative poem on the Portal and UPLOAD IT TO YOUR BLOG

___Creative Poem has a title

___MLA formatted information is in the top left hand corner, double spaced

___form of poem is student’s choice (size, font, colour, images, ect..)

___topic of poem is inspired by or related to topics of the Russian Revolution

___at least TWO words from our intro vocabulary activity are included in my poem

___I have saved the document with a name (ie. Poetry Revolt by Mary)

___I have TURNED IN and UPLOADED THE POEM TO MY BLOG


Download the PDF copy of the Lesson Plan below!!

One comment

  1. I am absolutely fascinated and impressed with the amount of detailed planning and work that goes into a single lesson plan. Wow! This is an amazing piece of work Sequoia! Your students are going to be so very fortunate to have you as their inspiration and guide! 🙏🌸

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s